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How can we make "imposed" or donor- or project-driven CBNRM more successful and sustainable? How can we identify and nuture more examples of "organic" CBNRM? (3 answers)

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The Malawi CBNRM stakeholder workshop which reviewed the Malawi CBNRM stocktaking report briefly discussed the categories of organic and imposed CBNRM. Organic CBNRM was loosely defined as a bottom-up initiative driven by traditional leadership and the development and enforcement of traditional NRM rules. Two examples were cited: Mbenje Island fisheries management and the Sendwe Village Forest Association. Organic CBNRM was generally felt to be poised for success though it was also noted that these types of initiatives were rare.

Imposed or project- or donor-driven CBNRM was loosely defined as an initiative that originated outside of the target community. It was noted that many of these initiatives falter once the project ends or donor funding is no longer available. It was noted that, in order for these initiatives to be successful, a clear exit strategy and a sound capacity building program were needed.

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Oct 15, 2010
Many things have affected development actions but among them the biggest set back remains the lack of grassroots ownership. The concepts and development frame are usually conceived from a technical perspective and not necessary according to the local priorities and understanding.

One thing is common however, anything imposed does not last it soon expires and disappears even if it was a great idea. There are many examples even here in Zambia which have not joined the chain of archives
-- Updated Dec 3, 2012 --

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    Oct 15, 2010
    Many things have affected development actions but among them the biggest set back remains the lack of grassroots ownership. The concepts and development frame are usually conceived from a technical perspective and not necessary according to the local priorities and understanding.

    One thing is common however, anything imposed does not last it soon expires and disappears even if it was a great idea. There are many examples even here in Zambia which have not joined the chain of archives
    -- Updated Dec 3, 2012 --
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      Nov 3, 2010
      Hi Noah. Thanks for your answer. I wonder if you can elaborate a bit more on how to achieve grassroots ownership. I think a lot of development projects do use participatory approaches that try to engage local communities and take their views, input and priorities into account. I'm thinking of methods such as Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRA) and Appreciative Inquiries. But perhaps this is not enough... Maybe we need to go further with involving local communities in the actual project design for CBNRM initiatives. Maybe we also need to involve social scientists much more -- as opposed to technical experts in forestry, wildlife, biodiversity, conservation, etc. What do you (and others) think?
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        Nov 5, 2010
        Hi Tom,

        Agree with you on the "need to go further with involving local communities in the actual project design for CBNRM initiatives".

        Having said that I think project design teams are increasingly aware of the need to enhance inputs of local people in project design and go about doing that with some modifications to PRA methods and methods evolved on ground based on real-time needs in the situation. We do this even as we tread the delicate, sensitive and invisible lines that separate project proponents, the designers and the people who will be actually affected by the project activities positively (or negatively). From my experience for project ownership and success it is critical to have local representatives from project areas including women and men (with a good age range) who can give a fair picture of natural resource history, its use and user rights in the project areas. It helps to have a provincial/national social scientist(s) with sound understanding of social structures, hierarchies, enabling/disabling policies that influence natural resources use and its management. Bringing in international experts with similar national and regional knowledge will strengthen the project design team giving opportunities to transfer lessons learnt from other countries or regions as applicable. Of course all the 'experts' on the team should be endowed with great listening skills, the ability to identify and relate to local needs (immediate and long term), should be willing to learn from the ground-up knowledge base and each other, and incorporate this learning into project design.

        Regards,

        Neeraja





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Date CreatedTuesday, October 12, 2010 11:46 AM
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